Miami Horror

biography

After touring the world multiple times over and internationally repping their Australian brand of electronica, Miami Horror are set to return in 2015 with their new album All Possible Futures, a record showcasing their eclectic mix of influences, newfound identity and focus on developed songwriting sure to cement their position in the electronic music world once again.

On the back of their successful debut Illumination, Miami Horror have spent the last 3 years living and writing between Melbourne and LA, finding it easy to settle in amongst other Australian expats, Bag Raiders, Empire of the Sun and Anna Lunoe along with friendly LA natives like Classixx and Ariel Pink.

"We wanted to move to LA for inspiration and influence more than anything. It helped us to experiment and find our own sound. If you look at a lot of the alternative electronica and dance music coming out of LA it definitely has a feel - we love the weirdness and sunshine. It has been a strong influence on many of our favourite records from the 60s-80s and we wanted to allow it to influence this record," says the band's producer Ben Plant.

Armed with Plant's ripened perspective, Miami Horror have delivered a huge 15-track studio album, littered with introspective songs and post-disco party jams inspired by the quirk of Talking Heads, New Order and INXS, through to the pop influence of Michael Jackson, Paul Simon and the dreamy aesthetic of Fleetwood Mac and Tame Impala thrown in for good measure.

"Because this was our sophomore album and a defining time in our career we really wanted to ensure that we creatively explored every direction we could possibly go," says Plant.

Plant describes the production process as one that was key to ensuring longevity and a sense of permanence for the new album, a medium which they feel is still necessary for creating a story and an emotional connection with music.

"We wanted to make something that lasts and grows the more you listen to it; we found a lot of fans overseas had been listening to our first album for years and that's what made us realise the importance of making something permanent in this day and age."

On the current state of the industry, Plant goes further to explain that a shift in how people consume music affected the new album's meaning. "We've seen the album format quiver and turn to a focus on artists writing one-off hits. We personally love albums and the story they can tell. A great album will still always stand out in history. Just like with the boom of disco singles in the '70s and then again with house music, we feel like this is a time where a lot of tracks & artists will be lost amongst sands of time."

With an eclectic mix of influences, identity and developed songwriting Miami Horror have delivered a progressive, heart-felt collection of songs that aim to break the mould and challenge the traditional constraints of our current industry climate. It's a sensory voyage from start to finish that will define 2015.

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discography

Stranger (The Remixes)
Stranger (The Remixes)
Stranger (The Remixes)